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In this system was called RDF, radio direction finding, or sometimes just DF, and it consisted of two elements, the ground transmitter and the airborne receiver. This was not especially new technology. However as the airborne equipment consisted of two loops of wire about five feet tall, wound at 90 degrees to each other and mounted on a turntable free to rotate inside the rear fuselage it was heavy and very cumbersome. There seems to have been only one robust trial of RDF equipment, in which an aeroplane was flown from Biggin Hill to Paris without sight of the ground, then back the next day. On the strength of these flights and some related work conducted at Andover the US Army Air Service ordered sets for use in their bombers, however the RAF remained unconvinced. A few other navigation systems were tested around the same time, but these fixed the aerials inside the wing and required the pilot to turn the aircraft towards the station to get a bearing, and then home in on it. Such manoeuvres may be useful if trying to return to base, but they did not help in hitting a target, and so as an aid to tactical navigation they did not catch on. Technical publications published in and explained how both systems worked, complete with photographs and wiring diagrams so it was hardly considered to be secret, but by it appears that the entire idea had been shelved. A few direction finding sets may have been floating about the squadrons until the mid s, but there does not seem to have been a standard fit, nor any formalised training programme.

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